The Foundation of Heaven: The Great Temple of the Aztecs

A Symposium in Homage to Eduardo Matos Moctezuma

In the Real of the Vision Serpent FINAL PRINT with added name (opacity 87)

This Mesoamerican Symposium in homage to Eduardo Matos-Moctezuma, organized by the Art History Society of California State University, Los Angeles and Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), promises to be spectacular.  It will take place on April 21 – 22 of 2017 in both locations.  This year is particularly unique.  In addition to our highly regarded keynote speakers, we will feature a very special event in conjunction with the symposium: all attendees and participants are invited to the inaugural viewing of a special exhibit of antique books of Mesoamerica and Colonial Mexico in the John F. Kennedy Library at California State University, Los Angeles after the closing of Saturday’s Symposium presentations.  The title of the exhibit is: Transcultural Dialogues: The Books of Mesoamerica and Colonial Mexico.  This exhibit shows some jewels of the Ruwet, Glass and Nicholson collections of California State University, Los Angeles that are open to scholars, students and general public and to are an integral part of a proposed center for the advancement of Mesoamerican Studies in our campus.

(Please see the program below)  (ADD PDF OF SCHEDULE)

As you all know, events of this nature are costly and the added features of this year’s symposium have added to that expense. However, in an effort to better help cover costs we will implement a door price and a pre-sale price.  The door price will be $25 with no exceptions to category.  Advance purchase will be unchanged as in previous years as follows:

  • $20 for general admission,
  • $15 for all other University and College students with student ID, and
  • $10 for CSULA students with student ID

The $10 CSULA student price is made possible by a subsidy of CSULA’s student body through Associated Students, Inc. (ASI).  This will be our 6th year in which we offer discounted prices if you pay in advance. The fee is for the whole weekend, both Friday & Saturday (and admission to the inaugural exhibit with reception). Students will need to provide their student number via email or letter and present their student ID at the door.

For additional information, please contact us at: ahscsula@gmail.com

Advance payment may be made in the following three ways:

BY MAIL: You can mail a check made payable to Art History Society of CSULA to the following address:

Art History Society and/or Dr. Manuel Aguilar
California State University, Los Angeles
Fine Arts Building, FA228
5151 State University Drive
Los Angeles, CA 90032

SQUARE:  You can pay through Square.  We will add $1.00 to the cost as a convenience fee to offset the fees and commissions charged to us by Square for the service.

Square Payment

IN PERSON: You can pay in cash or by check to the Art History Department located on the third floor of the Fine Arts Building at California State University, Los Angeles.

We will send you an email, text or call confirming receipt of payment. As the date approaches, we will provide you with more information.

Donations

Our student organization takes great pride in creating these type of artistic and cultural events for the service of our community. We appreciate your generous donation.

https://squareup.com/store/ahscsula

Recommended Hotels Near California State University, Los Angeles (CSULA):

City of Pasadena

Pasadena Hilton Hotel (official hotel of the symposium)

Pasadena Inn

Bissell House Bed and Breakfast

Sheraton Pasadena

Courtyard Marriot

City of Alhambra

Days Inn Alhambra


The Foundation of Heaven: The Great Temple of the Aztecs

A Symposium in Homage to Eduardo Matos Moctezuma

matos.png

Our 2017 Mesoamerican Symposium, a two day event, titled The Foundation of Heaven: The Great Temple of the Aztecs. A Symposium in Homage to Eduardo Matos-Moctezuma will take place on April 21, 2017 at Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) and April 22, 2017 at California State University, Los Angeles.


Eduardo Matos Moctezuma was born in 1940 in Mexico City; he graduated as an archaeologist from the Escuela Nacional de Antropología e Historia (ENAH, the National School of Anthropology and History) and obtained his Master and Ph.D. degrees in Anthropological Studies from the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM). Matos Moctezuma has conducted field work in such revered places as Tula, Comalcalco, Cholula, Teotihuacan, Tlatelolco, Tenochtitlan and various others. He served as a fig46z1.jpgprofessor in ENAH for over 30 years. He has over 500 works in print as articles, reviews, catalogues, guides, books. Among his most acclaimed works are Muerte a Filo de Obsidiana with 8 editions, Vida y Muerte en el Templo Mayor (Life and Death in the Templo Mayor), Los Aztecas (Aztecs), Las piedras negadas: De la Coatlicue al Templo Mayor (Lecturas mexicanas) to name, but a few. Matos Moctezuma has presented in over 1,000 conferences both nationally and internationally. He has been bestowed with the Chevalier dans l’Ordre des Palmes AcadémiquesChevalier de l’Ordre National du Mérite and given the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the Republic of France; awarded the Henry B. Nicholson Medal by Harvard University and an honorary doctorate in science by the University of Colorado Boulder. He is a member of the German Archaeological Institute, Colegio Nacional (Academy of Sciences of Mexico), and the Mexican Academy of History. He is an Emeritus Researcher at Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia (INAH), and was awarded the National Science and Arts Prize in 2007. In 2009 he was recognized by the foundation “Mexico Unido en Sus Valores Culturales.” 

PRESENTATION

ABSTRACT (TBA)

(PROGRAM SCHEDULE) 


KEYNOTE SPEAKERS 

Dr. John M.D Pohl is an eminent authority on North American Indian civilizations and has directed numerous archaeological excavations and surveys in Canada, the United States, Mexico, and Central America, as wepohlll as Europe. He has designed many exhibitions on North and Central American Indian peoples, including “The Aztec Pantheon and the Art of Empire” at the Getty Villa in 2010, and co-curated the exhibit “The Children of the Plumed Serpent: The Legacy of Quetzalcoatl in Ancient Mexico” at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Dr. Pohl is noted for bringing the ancient past to life using a wide variety of innovative techniques and his experiences have taken him from the Walt Disney Imagineering Department of Cultural Affairs to CBS television where he served as writer and producer for the American Indian Documentary Series “500 Nations,” and Princeton University where he was appointed as the first Peter Jay Sharp Curator and Lecturer in the Art of the Ancient Americas. Among his various titles:

* Children of the Plumed Serpent: The Legacy of Quetzalcoatl in Ancient Mexico. J. Paul Getty Museum, 2012. Co-authors: Virginia Fields and Victoria I. Lyall.
* The Aztec Pantheon and the Art of Empire. Scala Arts Publishers Inc., 2010. Co-author: Claire L. Lyons.
* Lord Eight Wind of Suchixtlan and the Heroes of Ancient Oaxaca: Reading History in the Codex Zouche-Nuttall. University of Texas Press, 2010. Co-authors: Robert Lloyd Williams & F. Kent Reilly III.
* Narrative Mixtec Ceramics of Ancient Mexico. Stinehour Press, 2007.
* The Legend of Lord Eight Deer: An Epic of Ancient Mexico. Oxford University Press, USA, 2002.
* Exploring Mesoamerica (Places in Time). Oxford University Press, USA, 2002.

Presentation: Eduardo Matos Moctezuma and the Reinvention of Mexican Archaeology

Abstract: Beginning in the early 1970’s, many Mexican and American archaeologists were trained in the “New Archaeology” which in turn was an outgrowth of dramatic changes in the field of anthropology orienting itself to more Marxist perspectives on culture. This led to an emphasis on population studies, environment and subsistence, especially with regard to the origin and evolution of the Mesoamerican state. In so doing archaeologists began to set aside the study of the art of ancient civilizations as being elite, esoteric and propagandistic while colonial histories were viewed as the corrupted perspectives of conquest society. The discovery of the Coyolxauqui stone on the other hand created a dilemma in that it forced Eduardo to have to seriously consider how to deal with monumental art and architecture in modern archaeological theory and in so doing also re-introduce the study of major historical works into analysis as well— all at a time when only archaeology, it was advocated, could produce any real “facts.” I will use several examples from the Templo Mayor project to illustrate how its investigators were able to get art and historical perspectives back out on the front end of research into civilizational development using a scientific method of inductive and deductive reasoning between the fields of archaeology, art history and ethnohistory.

Dr. Laura Filloy-Nadal 

BIO

TITLE

ABSTRACT

(TBA)

Dr. Leonardo Lopez-Lujan 

BIO

Presentation 1: Antonio De Leon y Gama and his Advertencias Anticriticas 

ABSTRACT

Presentation 2: Eduardo Matos Moctezuma: A Man of His Time 

ABSTRACT

(tba)

Dr. Teresa Uriarte 

BIO

PRESENTATION

ABSTRACT

(tba)

Prof. Raul Barrera 

BIO

Presentation:  El Huei Tzompantli Del Recinto Sagrado De Tenochititlan 

ABSTRACT

(tba)

Elizabeth Boone 

BIO

PRESENTATION

ABSTRACT

(tba)

Frances F. Berdan is a Professor Emerita of Anthropology at California State University San Bernardino, where she taught for more than f

354_00_2.jpgour decades. Her research focuses on Aztec economy, culture, and society, and on indigenous life under early Spanish colonial rule. She has authored or co-authored 14 books and more than 100 articles on these and related topics. Her most recent book is Aztec Archaeology and Ethnohistory (Cambridge University Press, 2014).

Presentation: Aztec Ritual Economy: A View from Tenochtitlan’s Templo Mayor

AbstractMany years ago Eduardo Matos Moctezuma proposed that the twin sanctuaries at Tenochtitlan’s Templo Mayor accentuated two primary themes in Aztec life: rain/fertility/agriculture on the Tlaloc side, and warfare/conquest/tribute on the Huitzilopochtli side. In essence, Tlaloc and Huitzilopochtli, secure atop their lofty temples, reflected the economic and political bases of Tenochtitlan. This paper builds on this perspective by exploring Tlaloc’s and Huitzilopochtli’s two economic realms through the lens of Tenochtitlan’s ritual economy.

Karl Taube is a Mesoamericanist, archaeologist, epigrapher and ethno-historian, known for his publications and research into the pre-Columbian cultures of Mesoamerica and the American Southwest. In 2008 he was named the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences distinguished lecturer. Dr. Taube received his B .A. in Anthropology in 1980 from Berkeley. At Yale he received his M.A. in 1983 and Ph.D. in 1988. taubeDr. Taube studied under several notable Mayanist researchers, including Michael D. Coe, Floyd Lounsbury and art historian Mary Miller. Taube later co-authored with Miller a well-received encyclopedic work, The Gods and Symbols of Ancient Mexico and the Maya. Field research undertaken during the course of his career include a number of assignments on archaeological, linguistic and ethnological projects conducted in the Chiapas highlands, Yucatán Peninsula, Central Mexico, Honduras and most recently, Guatemala. As of 2003, Taube has served as Project Iconographer for the Proyecto San Bartolo, co-directed by William Saturno and Monica Urquizu. His primary role is to interpret the murals of Pinturas Structure Sub-1, dating to the first century B.C. In 2004, Dr. Taube co-directed an archaeological project documenting previously unknown sources of “Olmec Blue” jadeite in eastern Guatemala. He has also investigated pre-Columbian sites in Ecuador and Peru.

PRESENTATION

ABSTRACT

(tba)

Ximena Chavez 

BIO

Presentation: The Offering of Life: Human and Animal Sacrifice at the Main Plaza of the Sacred Precinct, Tenotchitlan 

ABSTRACT

(tba)

Dr. Diana Magaloni 

BIO

PRESENTATION

ABSTRACT

(tba)

Dr. Barbara Mundy is a Professor of Art History at Fordham University; she received her Ph.D. in the History of Art at Yale University. She studies the art and visual culture produced in Spain’s colonies, and her scholarship spans both digital and traditional formats. With Dana Leibsohn, she is the creator of Vistas: Visual Culture in Spanish America, 1520-1820, now online and first pMundyublished as a DVD by University of Texas, 2010. Her latest book, The Death of Aztec Tenochtitlan, the Life of Mexico City (University of Texas, 2015) looks at the ecology and ritual life of the city, one of the largest in the world in the 16th century, as it was transformed from the Aztec imperial capital into the center of the Spanish viceroyalty and was the winner of the Association of Latin American Art’s Arvey award for the best book on Latin American Art and Architecture in 2015. Her first book, The Mapping of New Spain (University of Chicago, 1996) was awarded the Nebenzahl Prize in the History of Cartography in 1996. She edited, with Mary Miller, and contributed to Painting a Map of Sixteenth-Century Mexico City: Land, Writing and Native Rule, an interdisciplinary study of a rare indigenous map (Beinecke Library/Yale University Press, 2012). Her work has been supported by the National Endowment of the Humanities, the Argosy foundation, and the Center for Advanced Studies in Visual Art at the National Gallery of Art.

Presentation: The Flaying of Trees and the Destiny of Humans: The Meanings of paper in the Aztec World

Abstract: Recent finds in the Great Temple bear witness to the wide and varied usages of paper in the Aztec world. Amatl, paper, was made from the inner bark of the fig tree (ficus), and was used for offerings, for ornament, for clothing, for tribute, as well as for books, including the sacred tonalamatl, through which human destiny was foretold. The peoples of Central Mexico chose materials—especially those put to ritual ends–with thought and care. So what made the material of amatl so fitting for all these uses? In this paper, I look at the creation of amatl and its resultant physical properties, as revealed by contemporary scientific analysis, to reveal the holistic worldview that was made manifest through materials, down to the smallest scrap of paper.

Dr. Manuel Aguilar-Moreno is a Professor of Art History at California State University, Los Angeles. He received his B.S. in Electronic Engineering and a certification in Education at the ITESO Jesuit University of Mexico. He also earned a degree in Mexican History with emphasis on the state of Jalisco from El Colegio de Jalisco. In 1997 he earned an M.A. in Latin American Studies and in 1999 received an Interdiscip
aguilar .pnglinary Ph.D. in Art History and Anthropology from the University of Texas at Austin under the tutelage of the late Dr. Linda Schele and Dr. Karl Butzer. Dr. Aguilar-Moreno has made numerous cultural and research trips worldwide. He has been a professor of Mesoamerican and Colonial Mexican Art History, World History, History of México and Biblical Literature at such institutions as the ITESO Jesuit University and the Instituto de Ciencias, in Guadalajara, Mexico; the University of San Diego, California; the University of Texas at Austin; the Semester at Sea Program of the Universities of Pittsburgh and Virginia, teaching a complete semester on board of a ship around the world with fieldwork opportunities.
At present he is preparing a comprehensive book based on his Proyecto Ulama 2003-2013. Among his recent publications:

* The Perfection of Silence: The Cult of Death in Mexico. Guadalajara: Secretary of    Culture of Jalisco, 2003.
* Handbook to Life in the Aztec World. New York: Oxford Press, (2007)
* Utopía de Piedra: El Arte Tequitqui de Mexico. Guadalajara: Conexión Gráfica, (2005)

Presentation: The Codex Mendoza and the Ball of Tochtepec 

ABSTRACT

(tba)

Dr. Alfredo Lopez-Austin was already an established attorney in his hometown of Cuidad Juarez, Mexico before earning his doctorate in history from the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM). In time he quickly earned a reputation as a brilliant scholar in the fields of Mesoamerican mythology, iconography, caustin.pngosmology and ritual. His emphasis is on the Nahua civilization. Today, he is an Emeritus professor of Mesoamerican Cosmology at UNAM’S Facultad de Filosofia y Letras and an Emeritus Researcher at UNAM’S Instituto de Investigaciones Anthropologicas. Among his various recognitions, Lopez Austin recieved the lichiko Prize for Cultural Study in 1993 from the Institue for Intercultural & Transdisciplinary Studies in Toyko, Japan. In 1993 he also earned the Premio Universidad Nacional de Mexico for Research in Social Sciences. in 2007 he received recognition in Perugia, Italy during the 29th International Congress of Americanism for his lifetime achievements. In 2008 Lopez Austin was awarded a medal and certificate by the Senate of the University of Warsaw for his contributions in expanding the knowledge of Pre-Columbian cultures. More recently in 2011 during the Maya Meetings in Austin, Texas Lopez Austin received the Linda Schele Award. In the 2012 Mesoamerican Symosium, the Department of Art of California State University, Los Angeles in conjunction with The Art History Society of CSULA presented the Tlamantini Award to Alfredo Lopez Austin for his lifetime achievements in the field of Mesoamerican Studies.

Presentation: Mentiras y Verdades. Sobre la Verdad del Mito (Lies and Truths. About the Truth of the Myth) 

ABSTRACT (TBA)

Dr. David Carrasco

BIO

PRESENTATION

ABSTRACT

(tba)

We would like to remind you, that in addition to our highly regarded keynote speakers, we will feature a very special event in conjunction with the symposium: all attendees and participants are invited to the inaugural viewing of a special exhibit of antique books of Mesoamerica and Colonial Mexico in the John F. Kennedy Library at California State University, Los Angeles after the closing of Saturday’s Symposium presentations.  The title of the exhibit is: Transcultural Dialogues: The Books of Mesoamerica and Colonial Mexico.  This exhibit shows some jewels of the Ruwet, Glass and Nicholson collections of California State University, Los Angeles that are open to scholars, students and general public and to are an integral part of a proposed center for the advancement of Mesoamerican Studies in our campus.

Thank you for your interest and participation in our 6th annual Mesoamerican Symposium!

 

 

 

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Eternal Realms of Revelry – The MAW Collection of Pre-Columbian Art

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In the Realm of the Vision Serpent: Decipherments and Discoveries in Mesoamerica. A Symposium in Homage to Linda Schele

In the Real of the Vision Serpent FINAL PRINT with added name (opacity 87)This symposium in homage to Linda Schele, organized by the Art History Society of California State University, Los Angeles, promises to be our largest Mesoamerican Symposium to date.  It will take place on April 10 – 11 of 2015 in the Golden Eagle Hall of our campus.  This year is particularly special.  In addition to our highly regarded keynote speakers, we will feature several panels composed of prominent experts in the field of Mesoamerican Studies as well as several Ph.D. candidates.  You may select the panels or presentations you wish to attend (please see the program below).

We are also adding a very special event in conjunction with the 2015 symposium: all attendees and participants are invited to the inaugural viewing of a special Mesoamerican Art exhibit in the Fine Arts Gallery at California State University, Los Angeles after the closing of Friday’s Symposium presentations.  The title of the exhibit is: Eternal Realms of Revelry: The MAW Collection of Pre-Columbian Art.  This collection is intended to be donated to California State University, Los Angeles with the intention to be used for educational purposes and to be an integral part of a center for the advancement of Mesoamerican Studies in our campus.

As you all know, events of this nature are costly and the added features of this year’s symposium have added to that expense. However, in an effort to better help cover costs we will implement a door price and a presale price.  The door price will be $20 with no exceptions to category.  Advance purchase will be unchanged as in previous years as follows:

  •  $15 for general admission,
  • $10 for all other University and College students with student ID, and
  •  $5 for CSULA students with student ID

The $5 CSULA student price is made possible by a subsidy of CSULA’s student body through Associated Students, Inc. (ASI).  This will be our 3rd year with no price increase if you pay in advance. The fee is for the whole weekend, both Friday & Saturday (and admission to the inaugural exhibit with reception).

For RSVP and information, please contact us at: ahscsula@gmail.com

Advance payment may be made in the following three ways:

BY MAIL: You can mail a check made payable to Art History Society of CSULA to the following address:

Art History Society
California State University, Los Angeles
Fine Arts Building, FA228
5151 State University Drive
Los Angeles, CA 90032

We will send you an email, text or call confirming receipt of payment.

PAYPAL:  You can pay through PayPal.  We will add a dollar to the cost as a convenience fee to offset the fees and commissions charge to us by PayPal for the service.  Please email us expressing your desire to use this feature and we will send you a PayPal invoice to pay using a credit or debit account.

IN PERSON: You can pay in cash or by check to the Art History Department located on the third floor of the Fine Arts Building at California State University, Los Angeles.

Students will need to provide their student number via email or letter and present their student ID at the door.

Those that do not pay in advance and wish to attend, will pay $20 at door without exception to status as a student or not.  As the date approaches, we will provide you with more information.

Recommended Hotels Near California State University, Los Angeles (CSULA):

City of Pasadena

Pasadena Hilton Hotel (official hotel of the symposium)

http://www.hilton.com/en/hi/groups/personalized/P/PASPHHF-CSULA4-20150409/index.jhtml?WT.mc_id=POG

Pasadena Inn  http://www.oldpasadenainn.com

Bissell House Bed and Breakfast  http://www.bissellhouse.com

Sheraton Pasadena   http://www.sheratonpasadena.com

Courtyard Marriot   http://www.courtyardpasadena.com

City of Alhambra

Days Inn Alhambra   http://www.daysinn.com/hotels/california/alhambra/days-inn-alhambra-ca/hotel-overview

 

In the Realm of the Vision Serpent: Decipherments and Discoveries in Mesoamerica. A Symposium in Homage to Linda Schele

Linda Schele

Our 2015 Mesoamerican Symposium titled In the Realm of the Vision Serpent: Decipherments and Discoveries in Mesoamerica, a Symposium in Homage to Linda Schele will take place on April 10-11, 2015 at California State University, Los Angeles.

Dr. Linda Schele was a pioneer in the decipherment of the Maya Hieroglyphic Writing and an extraordinary professor of Maya and Mesoamerican Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. She was a very influential and passionate professor that mentored her students to excellence and inspired them to discover and interpret the diverse aspects of the Mesoamerican World eith a critical approach.  Many of them are today among the leaders in the field of Mesoamerican Studies.  On April 18, 1998, she passed away of pancreatic cancer at the age of 55. She was laid to rest on a hill top overlooking Lake Atitlan in Guatemala. For more details of her enormous contributions please read the following:  http://www.utexas.edu/faculty/council/1998 1999/memorials/Schele/schele.html

On April 11, 2015 Linda Schele will be presented posthumously the Tlamatini Award at California State University, Los Angeles.  David Schele, her widower, will be present to receive the award on her behalf as will be many of her former students.

PROGRAM OF THE SYMPOSIUM: 

Symposium Schedule

PANEL PRESENTATIONS LIST:

Panel Presentations

 

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

Dr. Mary Miller

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mary Miller, Sterling Professor of History of Art, served as dean of Yale College from December 2008 until June 2014. Before assuming the deanship, Miller served as master of Saybrook College for nearly a decade. Miller earned her A.B. from Princeton in 1975 and her Ph.D. from Yale in 1981, joining the faculty in that year. She has served as chair of the Department of History of Art, chair of the Council on Latin American Studies, director of Graduate Studies in Archeological Studies, and as a member of the Steering Committee of the Women Faculty Forum at Yale. A specialist of the art of the ancient New World, Miller curated The Courtly Art of the Ancient Maya at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., and the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco in 2004. For that exhibition, she wrote the catalogue of the same title with Simon Martin, senior epigrapher at the University of Pennsylvania Museum. Among her other books are The Murals of Bonampak, The Blood of Kings (with Linda Schele), The Art of Mesoamerica, Maya Art and Architecture, The Gods and Symbols of Ancient Mexico and the Maya (with Karl Taube), and A Pre-Columbian World (co-edited with Jeffrey Quilter). She has most recently completed Painting a Map of Mexico City (co-edited with Barbara Mundy; 2012, a study of the rare indigenous map in the Beinecke Library) and The Spectacle of the Late Maya Court: Reflections on the Murals of Bonampak (with Claudia Brittenham; 2013).

PRESENTATION: A Feathered Plate for the Afterlife.

ABSTRACT:    From at least 600 onward, plates painted with geometric feather designs form a critical element of funerary offering, and nowhere more so than at Tikal and Uaxactun; Tikal’s famous “Tomb of the Jade Jaguar” had ten such vessels, almost certainly piled high with food for the dead lord. What do the feathers mean? How can we link this imagery with the other common subject painted inside plates, the dancing Maize God? In this talk, the feathered plates, Maize God plates, and muwan bird plates of Campeche and Yucatan will all be brought into one narrative frame.

Dr. Karl Taube

Dr. Karl Taube is a Mesoamericanist, archaeologist, epigrapher and ethno-historian, known for his publications and research into the pre-Columbian cultures of Mesoamerica and the American Southwest. In 2008 he was named the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences distinguished lecturer. Dr. Taube received his B .A. in Anthropology in 1980 from Berkeley. At Yale he received his M.A. in 1983 and Ph.D. in 1988. Dr. Taube studied under several notable Mayanist researchers, including Michael D. Coe, Floyd Lounsbury and art historian Mary Miller. Taube later co-authored with Miller a well-received encyclopedic work, The Gods and Symbols of Ancient Mexico and the Maya. Field research undertaken during the course of his career include a number of assignments on archaeological, linguistic and ethnological projects conducted in the Chiapas highlands, Yucatán Peninsula, Central Mexico, Honduras and most recently, Guatemala. As of 2003, Taube has served as Project Iconographer for the Proyecto San Bartolo, co-directed by William Saturno and Monica Urquizu. His primary role is to interpret the murals of Pinturas Structure Sub-1, dating to the first century B.C. In 2004, Dr. Taube co-directed an archaeological project documenting previously unknown sources of “Olmec Blue” jadeite in eastern Guatemala. He has also investigated pre-Columbian sites in Ecuador and Peru.

PRESENTATION: The Initial Series Group at Chichen Itza, Yucatan: Recent Studies and Interpretations

ABSTRACT: Archaeological fieldwork performed by the Proyecto Chichen Itza under the direction of Peter Schmidt during 1999 to 2002 uncovered a remarkable series of bas-relief friezes from the upper portions of palace and temple structures. The focus of this study will be buildings featuring avian and floral imagery, including abundant representations of cacao. Many of the friezes contain scenes portraying an avian-headed figure playing music surrounded by floating elements pertaining to music and dance. The relation of music to precious birds is well known for Late Postclassic Central Mexico, as can be seen in the early colonial Nahuatl texts in the Cantares Mexicanos. In addition, these same songs as well other early colonial Nahuatl sources also relate music, flowers and birds to concepts of paradise. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that a very similar complex existed among the more ancient Classic Maya, including the wind deity — god of music and closely related to flowers as well as the embodiment of the breath soul. For the Classic Maya, there was also a duck-billed form of the wind god, forms of which can probably can be traced to much more ancient periods, probably even to the Early Formative of south coastal Chiapas. In contrast to southeastern Mesoamerica, duck-billed anthropomorphic figures are notably absent until the Late Postclassic period in Central Mexico, where he appears as the wind god Ehecatl, a being also closely related to music. In this study, I argue that the avian figure in the Initial Series at Chichen Itza constitutes an Early Postclassic form of the wind god and as such, can be considered as an ancestral form of Ehecatl. Moreover, the Initial Series Group has the most developed monumental program dedicated to the production of cacao in ancient Mesoamerica, with the immediate topography strongly indicating why.

Dr. Marc Zender

Marc Zender received his PhD in archaeology from the University of Calgary in 2004. He has taught at the University of Calgary (2002-2004) and Harvard University (2005-2011), and is now an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Tulane University, New Orleans, where he has taught epigraphy, linguistics and Mesoamerican languages since September 2011. Marc’s research interests include anthropological and historical linguistics, comparative writing systems, and archaeological decipherment, with a regional focus on Mesoamerica (particularly Mayan and Nahuatl/Aztec). He is the author of several books and dozens of articles exploring these subjects. In addition to his research and writing, Marc is associate editor of The PARI Journal, and (with Joel Skidmore) co-maintainer of Mesoweb, a major internet resource for the study of Mesoamerican cultures.

PRESENTATION:  Abbreviational Conventions of Classic Maya Writing

ABSTRACT: Logosyllabic scripts frequently abbreviate phonemes and morphemes that are nonetheless critical to linguistic interpretation and translation. Abbreviational conventions therefore represent a particularly important field of study for those who propose to understand ancient texts. In the case of Maya writing, it is now well known that this script routinely elides word-final consonants and the first consonant of a cluster when they belong to a class of weak consonants: ʔ, h, j, l, m, n, w, and y (Lacadena and Zender 2001:2-3; Zender 1999:130-142). Another widespread abbreviational convention, shared with such diverse scripts as Egyptian hieroglyphic and Runic, has been termed haplography, whereby a given sign is recorded only once when it should be represented twice, as in ka-wa for ka[ka]w and AJAW-le for ajawle[l] (Zender 2010:4). We can recognize haplography in Maya writing because it alternates with double writing (e.g., ka-ka-wa and AJAW-le-le) and with a diacritical marker that apparently signals the presence of duplicate consonants (e.g., ²ka-wa and AJAW-²le), sometimes also appearing with logograms that are C₁VC₁ in shape (e.g., ²K’AHK’, ²TZUTZ). Finally, Maya writing also frequently elides essential morphological suffixes in the presence of logograms, such that BAJ alternates with ba-la-ja (bajlaj) and OCH with o-chi (och-i) (Zender 2010:4-5). These complex conventions now cast doubt on several previously accepted decipherments, but they also cast new light on others, and suggest procedures that will help to minimize their confounding influences in the future.

Dr. David Stuart

Dr. David Stuart is the David and Linda Schele Professor of Mesoamerican Art and Writing at the University of Texas at Austin. He received his Ph.D in Anthropology from Vanderbilt University in 1995, and taught at Harvard University for eleven years before arriving at UT Austin in 2004, where he now teaches in the Department of Art and Art History. His interests in the traditional cultures of Mesoamerica are wide-ranging, but his primary research focuses is the archaeology and epigraphy of ancient Maya civilization, and for the past three decades he has been very active in the decipherment of Maya hieroglyphic writing. Over the past two decades his major research has centered on the art and epigraphy at Copan (Honduras), Palenque (Mexico), Piedras Negras, La Corona, and San Bartolo (Guatemala). Stuart’s early work on the decipherment of Maya hieroglyphs led to a MacArthur Fellowship (1984-1989). His books include Palenque: Eternal City of the Maya (Thames and Hudson), and most recently The Order of Days (Random House), a popular account of ancient Maya calendars and cosmology. Stuart is also currently the director of The Mesoamerica Center at the University of Texas at Austin, which fosters multi-disciplinary studies on ancient American art and culture. In addition, he oversees the activities of the newly established Casa Herrera, UT’s academic research center in Antigua, Guatemala, devoted to studies in the art, archaeology and culture of Mesoamerica.

PRESENTATION: The 8,000 Gods: An Examination of Sacred Beings and Categories in Classic Maya Theology

ABSTRACT: Today we know a great deal about ancient Maya gods, especially their individual imagery and associated iconography. What we lack, however, is a sense of how gods were conceived and categorized within a larger theological system of sacred beings. Using new translations of several revealing texts I will examine the ways the Maya described and classified their own religious system. These sources hint at the internal structure of the animate Maya cosmos — a topic that was always central to Linda’s research and to our own close collaborations.

Dr. David Freidel

Dr. David Freidel studies the emergence and fluorescence of government institutions among the lowland Maya of southeastern Mexico and Central America. Currently he is directing long-term research at the royal city of El Perú, ancient Waka’, in northwestern Petén, Guatemala. Established in the Preclassic period by roughly 100 BC, El Perú-Waka’ was the capital of a kingdom and seat of a royal dynasty that endured more than five hundred years and boasted more than 26 successors to the throne, finally collapsing in early ninth century. The Waka’ kingdom commanded strategic trade routes, to the west along a major river, the San Pedro Martir, and to the north overland to the central lowlands of the Yucatan peninsula. Major historical events at the city include its subordination to the principal imperial conquerors of the Maya world: Siyaj K’ahk’ in the fourth century, and Yuknoom Chen II in the seventh century. Although not as large or imposing as the major regional capitals of the Maya world, El Perú-Waka’ is historically important and a productive laboratory for investigating all aspects of Classic Maya civilization.

PRESENTATION: Standing on the Edge dreaming of the Center: Linda Schele’s Vision of a Unified Maya Field

ABSTRACT: When Linda and I were collaborating in the eighties she looked forward to the day when all students of the southern lowland Classic Maya civilization would participate in a common effort, their independent sources of information and insight embraced, as Evon Vogt would have said, by the collective intention of the ancient sages to inscribe a common history. She was clear in her own mind that the decipherment would reveal that the rulers and courtiers of Classic kingdoms addressed not only their own local constituencies but also their peers throughout the Classic world. Her efforts to articulate this view of the center from afar informed her books. I reflect on this effort and the current state of the center.

Dr. F. Kent Reilly

Dr. F. Kent Reilly, III ia a pre-historian and his interests converge around religion, art, and visual validation of elite authority in New World chiefdoms and early states. His primary focus is Mesoamerican Civilization and has spent a great deal of research examining the art and symbols of the ancient Olmec (1200-400 BC), and Classic Maya (AD 200-900) cultures. In 1995 he was a guest curator and a catalog contributor to the Princeton University exhibition “The Olmec World: Art, Ritual, and Rulership.” He has published articles on the ecological origin of Olmec symbolsThe Mesoamerica Center-University of Texas at Austinnfluence of Olmec symbols on the iconography of Maya rulership and the origin and function of the Olmec symbol system. Interest in addition to the ancient Olmec and Maya, include the art and iconography of the prehistoric Mississippian Period of the Southeastern United States. In 2004 Dr. Reilly was a member of the advisory board and a catalog contributor to the Art Institute of Chicago exhibition “Hero, Hawk, and Open Hand; Ancient Native American Art of the Midwest and South.” In 2011 Dr. Reilly was chosen as the Field Anthropologist Consultant for the Muscogee Nation of Florida. The tribe hopes Dr. Reilly will be able to offer fresh insight, research material and advice as they seek federal recognition. This is the final phase of a 63 year journey and the tribe asked Dr. Reilly for his assistance in this last step because of his extensive knowledge of Muscogee government, ceremonial cycles and traditions.

PRESENTATION: The Maya Hauberg Stela and the late Olmec-style sculpture The Young Lord: Middle Formative Origin of the Early Classic Period Maya Stela Cult

ABSTRACT: The stela is a rare form of public monument in the Maya Lowlands before the Classic Period. Stela were, however, a prominent medium for recording ritual activity at such Middle and Late Formative Period sites as La Venta, in the Olmec heartland and Izapa, on the Pacific coast of Chiapas. The iconography and hieroglyphic inscription carved on the Protoclassic (A.D. 100-200) Hauberg Stela (H.83.8 cm) clearly illustrates that at this early date Maya rulers were validating their elite position through information carved on stela. Specifically, the Hauberg Stela (a Maya work of art near and dear to Linda Schele) depicts a standing, masked, male ruler engaged in ritual actions focusing on bloodletting, supernatural communication, and the establishment of a cosmological framework. A comparison of a Late Middle Formative, stela-like, three-dimensional sculpture from the Pacific Coast region of Guatemala with the Hauberg Stela demonstrates that all of the major themes carried on the Hauberg were fully functioning in a similar medium some 500 years earlier. Like the Hauberg, The “The Young Lord’ or ‘Slim” (65.5 cm) depicts a thin standing, masked, male figure incised with a complex set of secondary symbols. A structural examination of these symbols reveals the same themes of bloodletting, supernatural communication, and cosmological framework which are used to validate the elite position of the ruler depicted on the Hauberg Stela. Furthermore, the relative size of the two sculptures and the similarities of the costuming strongly suggests that they are both fulfilling identical ideological and political functions.

Dr. Julia Guernsey 

Julia Guernsey received her Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin in 1997, and has taught ancient Mesoamerican art and culture history in the Department of Art and Art History at the University of Texas at Austin since 2001. Her research and publications continue to focus on the Middle and Late Preclassic periods in ancient Mesoamerica, in particular on sculptural expressions of rulership during this time. She also continues to participate on the La Blanca Archaeological Project, which is exploring this large site that dominated the Pacific coastal and piedmont region of Guatemala during the Middle Preclassic period. Her publications include Sculpture and Social Dynamics in Preclassic Mesoamerica, published by (Cambridge University Press); The Place of Stone Monuments: Context, Use, and Meaning in Mesoamerica’s Preclassic Transition co-edited, with colleagues John E. Clark (Brigham Young University) and Bárbara Arroyo (Francisco Marroquín University); and Ritual and Power in Stone: The Performance of Rulership in Mesoamerican Izapan Style Art, published by the University of Texas Press.

PRESENTATION: Preclassic Sculpture and its Relationship to the Popol Vuh

ABSTRACT: This paper will consider the thematic continuities between Preclassic monuments and the text of the Popol Vuh. Numerous scholars have addressed these parallels, particularly as depicted in the sculpture of Izapa, Chiapas, as clear evidence of the duration of key and recurring narratives for well over a thousand years in Mesoamerica. While the continuities are clear and compelling, there are also differences in the narratives throughout time that are more difficult to understand. This paper will explore both of these aspects – continuity and difference – between the text of the Popol Vuh and monuments from the Preclassic period in Mesoamerica.

Dr. Rex Koontz

Dr. Rex Koontz is a Professor and Director of the University of Houston, School of Art. His work centers on the art of the Ancient Americas. He is currently investigating the portable sculpture tradition along the Gulf Coast of Mexico between A.D. 100-1000. These objects, known as yoke, hacha, or palma depending on their form, are important for the understanding of the place of artistry in Ancient Mexican politics and culture. More general interests include the construction of meaningful urban spaces in this area and how the programs of sculpture, architecture, painting, and performance seen in the center of these cities helped shape and focus the ancient urban experience. Recent books include Lightning Gods and Feathered Serpents: The Public Sculpture of El Tajin andBlood and Beauty: Organized Violence in the Art and Archaeology of Mesoamerica and Central America (the latter edited with Heather Orr, both 2009). He has done fieldwork in Mexico, Guatemala, and Honduras under the aegis of the Tinker Foundation, the University Research Council of the University of Texas, and the National Endowment for the Humanities, among others. He is currently working on a digital tool for visual analysis, VWire, that was awarded a Digital Humanities Startup Grant by the NEH in 2011-12.

PRESENTATION: The Identity of Classic Veracruz Palma Figures

ABSTRACT: Palmas – the intricately carved portable sculptures that are closely associated with the Mesoamerican rubber ball game – are found chiefly with the remains of Late Classic Veracruz civilization. Many palmas contain single figures carved in full round who are dressed in complex costumes and hold important objects. Who do these figures represent, and how are they involved with the ball game and its place in Late Classic Veracruz civilization? This presentation will discuss the palma figures in relation to scenes in Veracruz ball courts and elsewhere, proposing that the figures are secondary-tier nobility who were important to rites of investiture of kings, and that the palmas themselves may have been status objects that indicated that noble office.

Dr. Peter Mathews

Dr. Peter Mathews is Emeritus Professor of Archaeology at La Trobe University in Australia. He received his BA from the University of Calgary and his PhD from Yale University. His specialization is Maya hieroglyphic writing, and in 1984 he received a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship Prize for his contribution to the decipherment of the script. Among his publications he co-authored with Dr. Schele the seminal publication, The Code of Kings: The Language of Seven Sacred Maya Temples and Tombs published in 1999.

PRESENTATION: The Parentage Paper: an unpublished paper by Linda Schele, Peters Mathews, and Floyd G. Lounsbury

ABSTRACT: In 1975 Linda Schele, Peter Mathews, and Floyd Lounsbury saw a pattern in inscriptions from Yaxchilan that named the ruler and then appeared record his parentage. We then looked for similar patterns in the texts of other sites, and found numerous examples. (Christopher Jones had, unbeknownst to us, already discovered the pattern in texts at Tikal.) We proceeded to prepare an article for publication, including illustrations of all the examples we could find, but for various reasons the paper was never published. It was, however, widely circulated in typescript form among our colleagues. This presentation gives a brief history and description of what has come to be known as “the Parentage Paper”

Dr. John M.D. Pohl

Dr. John M.D. Pohl is an eminent authority on North American Indian civilizations and has directed numerous archaeological excavations and surveys in Canada, the United States, Mexico, and Central America, as well as Europe. He has designed many exhibitions on North and Central American Indian peoples, including “The Aztec Pantheon and the Art of Empire” at the Getty Villa in 2010, and co-curated the exhibit “The Children of the Plumed Serpent: The Legacy of Quetzalcoatl in Ancient Mexico” at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Dr. Pohl is noted for bringing the ancient past to life using a wide variety of innovative techniques and his experiences have taken him from the Walt Disney Imagineering Department of Cultural Affairs to CBS television where he served as writer and producer for the American Indian Documentary Series “500 Nations,” and Princeton University where he was appointed as the first Peter Jay Sharp Curator and Lecturer in the Art of the Ancient Americas. Among his various titles:

* Children of the Plumed Serpent: The Legacy of Quetzalcoatl in Ancient Mexico. J. Paul Getty Museum, 2012. Co-authors: Virginia Fields and Victoria I. Lyall.
* The Aztec Pantheon and the Art of Empire. Scala Arts Publishers Inc., 2010. Co-author: Claire L. Lyons.
* Lord Eight Wind of Suchixtlan and the Heroes of Ancient Oaxaca: Reading History in the Codex Zouche-Nuttall. University of Texas Press, 2010. Co-authors: Robert Lloyd Williams & F. Kent Reilly III.
* Narrative Mixtec Ceramics of Ancient Mexico. Stinehour Press, 2007.
* The Legend of Lord Eight Deer: An Epic of Ancient Mexico. Oxford University Press, USA, 2002.
* Exploring Mesoamerica (Places in Time). Oxford University Press, USA, 2002.

PRESENTATION: Eternal Realms of Revelry: The MAW Collection of Pre-Columbian Art

Dr. Manuel Aguilar-Moreno

Dr. Manuel Aguilar-Moreno is a Professor of Art History at California State University, Los Angeles.
He received his B.S. in Electronic Engineering and a certification in Education at the ITESO Jesuit University of Mexico. He also earned a degree in Mexican History with emphasis on the state of Jalisco from El Colegio de Jalisco. In 1997 he earned an M.A. in Latin American Studies and in 1999 received an Interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Art History and Anthropology from the University of Texas at Austin under the tutelage of the late Dr. Linda Schele and Dr. Karl Butzer.

Dr. Aguilar-Moreno has made numerous cultural and research trips worldwide. He has been a professor of Mesoamerican and Colonial Mexican Art History, World History, History of México and Biblical Literature at such institutions as the ITESO Jesuit University and the Instituto de Ciencias, in Guadalajara, Mexico; the University of San Diego, California; the University of Texas at Austin; the Semester at Sea Program of the Universities of Pittsburgh and Virginia, teaching a complete semester on board of a ship around the world with fieldwork opportunities.
At present he is preparing a comprehensive book based on his Proyecto Ulama 2003-2013. Among his recent publications:
• The Perfection of Silence: The Cult of Death in Mexico. Guadalajara: Secretary of Culture of Jalisco, 2003.
• Handbook to Life in the Aztec World. New York: Oxford Press, (2007)
• Utopía de Piedra: El Arte Tequitqui de Mexico. Guadalajara: Conexión Gráfica ,(2005)

PRESENTATION: From Texas to California: A Journey with Linda Schele

ABSTRACT:  This is a testimonial presentation and will help to explain what Linda Schele means for me and my students at Cal State LA.  I will tell a moving story that as incredible as it may seem, it is totally real.  This story proves that we live in a world where people and things exist for a reason and their interactions produce effects that change our lives forever.  There are moments in which we just need to say Thanks, keep walking with faith and follow our destiny wherever it takes us.  At the end of the road we will understand why things happen and who we really are.   This story tells about how the spirit and legacy of Linda Schele came to Los Angeles to stay here.

Thank you for your interest and participation in our 5th annual Mesoamerican Symposium!

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 PAST EVENTS:

 

THE LAND OF SACRED ANIMALS: ARCHEOZOOLOGY AT THE GREAT TEMPLE OF TENOCHTITLAN 

THE LAND OF SACRED ANIMALS-page-001 (1)Ximena Chávez Balderas is a Bio-archaeologist at the Templo Mayor Project. She is specialized in funerary archaeology, sacrificial practices, mortuary treatments and archaeozoology. She earned her BA from the Escuela Nacional de Antropología e Historia. Her Mphil was awarded by the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México and her MA by Tulane University. She is PhD candidate at Tulane University. She was the main curator of the Templo Mayor Museum between 2001 and 2007. She received three INAH national awards for her BA thesis, her Mphil thesis and for an exhibition she curated in 2006. She has presented more than fifty lectures and conference papers and has published some thirty articles as well as a volume on funerary rituals—specifically cremation—at the Templo Mayor. Currently, she is working on two books, one as author and the other as editor. Chávez Balderas has worked on a number of national and international exhibitions and has excavated at Teotihuacan (including Teopancazco, Xalla, and the Pyramids of the Moon and the Sun), Loma Guadalupe in Michoacán, Huacas de Moche, Perú, and the Great Temple of Tenochtitlan.

This special presentation on THURSDAY FEBRUARY 26, 2015 at 7:00 pm at STUDENT UNION @California State University, Los Angeles. We have limited space please RSVP to AHSCSULA@gmail to guarantee seating. Thank you

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AN EVENING OF ZAPOTEC POETRY AT CAL STATE LA

. Filemón Beltrán Morales will give a reading of his Zapotec-language poetry at California State University, Los Angeles. A Published author, language activist, and well respected musician, Filemón Beltran Morales writes his poetry in the endangered San Bartolomé Zoogocho Zapotec language.

The event will be from 6:30 to 8:30 pm on the campus of CSULA in BIOS 144.

Co-sponsored by the Department of English, the American Communities Program, and the Center for Contemporary Poetics at California State University, Los Angeles; the Frente Indígena de Organizaciones Binacionales; and the Endangered Languages Fund.

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The Art History Society is proud to present an International Two-Day Mesoamerican Conference in Homage to 

Alfredo López Austin

February 10-11, 2012 at CSULA.  Friday, Feb 10, the conference will be in the Student Union Theater at CSULA.  Saturday, Feb 11, the conference will be in the Golden Eagle Ballroom at CSULA. The theme is Teotihuacan to Tenochtitlan: Cultural Continuity in Central Mexico.

Please reserve these dates at AHSMeso2012@gmail.com  $10 admission ($5 for CSULA students with Student ID). All day parking is $6 per day.  The parking lots closest to the Student Union and Golden Eagle Ballrooms are Lot 5 or Structure C.

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PARTICIPANTS:

ALFREDO  LÓPEZ AUSTIN, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.

Investigator at the Instituto de Investigaciones Antropológicas of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM). Alfredo López Austin also received his doctorate in history from UNAM. A specialist in Mesoamerican history and culture with a focus on cosmovision, myth, ritual, and iconography, he is the co-author of six books and has written fifthteen as sole author. Among the latter are Hombre-dios: Cuerpo humano e ideología (English edition, The Human Body and Ideology); Los mitos del tlacuache (English edition, The Myths of the Oposum); El conejo en la cara de la Luna (English edition, The Rabbit on the Face of the Moon; Japanese edition, Tuki no usagi); Tamoanchan y Tlalocan (English edition, Tamoanchan, Tlalocan: Places of Mist; French edition, Les paradis de brume). As coauthor with Leonardo López Luján, he has published El pasado indígena (English edition, Mexico’s Indigenous Past; Italian edition, Il passato indigeno); Mito y realidad de Zuyuá, and Monte Sagrado-Templo Mayor. As coauthor with Luis Millones, he published the book Dioses del Norte, dioses del Sur: Religiones y cosmovisión en Mesoamérica y los Andes.

A highly revered Mexican archaeologist that has since 1978 directed excavations at the Templo Mayor, the remains of a major Aztec pyramid in central Mexico City. Matos Moctezuma graduated with a master’s degree in archaeology from the National School of Anthropology and History and a master’s degree in anthropology from the National Autonomous University of Mexico. He has excavated at archaeological sites in both the Maya area and in central Mexico. In addition to the Templo Mayor Project, Matos has directed major fieldwork projects at the sites of Tula and Teotihuacan. He has also made important contributions to the study of the history of archaeology in Mexico. Matos Moctezuma was director of the Templo Mayor project from its start in 1978. This was one of the most important archaeological projects in the world. Several seasons of excavations uncovered the construction history of this central temple of the Aztec Empire. Numerous rich offerings were located around the temple area. This project overturned scholarly understanding of Aztec religion, empire, and ideology. Matos Moctezuma oversaw the creation of the Templo Mayor Museum in which these spectacular finds are displayed in lavish exhibits, and he directed the Museum for many years. 1987 saw the creation of the Urban Archaeology Program (directed by Matos) in which excavations in downtown Mexico City were expanded beyond the immediate site of the Templo Mayor. This research continues today.
LEONARDO LÓPEZ LUJÁNDirector Museo del Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan
Leonardo López Luján is a Senior Professor and Researcher at the Museo del Templo Mayor, INAH (Mexico City). Dr. López Luján has excavated in the ruins of Tenochtitlan since 1980, and directed the Templo Mayor (Great Temple) Project since 1991. He received his Ph.D. in Archaeology from University of Paris, and has been an invited professor at the Sorbonne in Paris and at the Sapienza in Rome. He has been a visiting research fellow at Princeton University and Dumbarton Oaks, Washington D.C.

He has authored and edited more than 19 books and has written over 80 articles in journals and books from Mexico, the United States, Europe, and Japan. Among his published works are: The Offerings of the Templo Mayor of Tenochtitlan; Gli altopiani delle guerre (with G. Mastache and R. Cobean); Mexico’s Indigenous Past (with A. López Austin); Aztèques. La collection de sculptures du Musée du quai Branly (with M.-F. Fauvet), La Casa de las Águilas, and Monte Sagrado-Templo Mayor (forthcoming, with A. López Austin).

DIANA MAGALONI KERPEL, Director, National Museum of Anthropology Mexico
Diana Magaloni Kerpel studied at the National Institute of Anthropology and History specializing in restoration and mural painting, and received graduate degrees in art history from the National Autonomous University (UNAM) in Mexico City and from Yale University. Her research has focused on the study of Mesoamerican and indigenous pictorial techniques in the 16th century, and she is developing an interdisciplinary method combining chemistry, physics, archaeology, ethnography, and art history to understand how mural paintings and codices were created. She has written extensively about pre-Hispanic mural art and is currently writing a book about the materials, images, symbolism, and narratives of the Florentine Codex.

National Museum of Anthropology in Mexico City is the finest museum of archaeology and anthropology in the Western hemisphere exceeding collections found at the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C. The National Museum of Anthropology owns the world’s most impressive collection of pre-Columbian Mexican art, including sculpture, painting, pottery, and other works. Since it was founded in 1964, it has displayed and studied the fascinating art, artifacts, and cultures of the pre-Columbian Mexican world and its descendants, the indigenous peoples of Mexico.

KARL TAUBEUniversity of California, Riverside
An American Mesoamericanist, archaeologist, epigrapher and ethno-historian, known for his publications and research into the pre-Columbian cultures of Mesoamerica and the American Southwest. In 2008 he was named the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences distinguished lecturer.
Taube received his B.A. in Anthropology in 1980 from Berkeley and his masters from Yale in 1983 and 1988 he received his Doctorate. At Yale Taube studied under several notable Mayanist researchers, including Michael D. Coe, Floyd Lounsbury and the art historian Mary Miller. Taube later coauthored with Miller a well-received encyclopaedic work, The Gods and Symbols of Ancient Mexico and the Maya. Field research undertaken during the course of his career include a number of assignments on archaeological, linguistic and ethnological projects conducted in the Chiapas highlands, Yucatán Peninsula, central Mexico, Honduras and most recently, Guatemala. As of 2003, Taube has served as Project Iconographer for the Proyecto San Bartolo, co-directed by William Saturno and Monica Urquizu. His primary role is to interpret the murals of Pinturas Structure Sub-1, dating to the first century B.C. In 2004, Taube co-directed an archaeological project documenting previously unknown sources of “Olmec Blue” jadeite in eastern Guatemala. Taube has also investigated pre-Columbian sites in Ecuador and Peru.An early theme examined by Taube’s papers and other publications concerned the agricultural development and symbolism of Mesoamerica, such as in his 1983 presentation to the 5th Palenque Round Table on the Maya maize god. Taube has also written on the symbolism and deity associations of maize for other cultures, such as the Olmec. Another research theme explored by Taube is that of inter– and intra-regional exchanges and contacts for Mesoamerica, such as with those of Aridoamerica and the American Southwest. He has also researched the interactions between Teotihuacan, a dominant center in Mexico’s plateau region during the Classic era, and contemporary Maya polities.
JOHN M.D. POHL, Adjunct Professor Department of Art History at UCLA and Curator for
Children of the Plumed Serpent” at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Dr. Pohl has conducted archaeological excavations in North and Central America, curated several major exhibitions, and published extensively on American Indian civilizations of southern Mexico. His books include Exploring Mesoamerica, The Politics of Symbolism in the Mixtec Codices, and Aztecs and Conquistadores: The Spanish Invasion and the Collapse of the Aztec Empire. He is currently preparing a much anticipated Mesoamerican exhibit at LACMA entitled Children of the Feather Serpent. Dr. Pohl is considered an expert in Mixtec and Zapotec iconography. He currently holds teaching positions at both UCLA and CSULA. Dr. Pohl received his B.A. from Hampshire College and his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Archaeology from UCLA.
FRANCES BERDAN, Professor Emeritus, Department of Anthropology California State University, San Bernardino
Dr. Berdan, has been a member of the CSBS Anthropology Department since 1973. In 1983, Dr. Berdan was the recipient of the CSU systemwide “Outstanding Professor.” Dr. Berdan specializes in Mesoamerican cultures and is known internationally as an expert on Aztec civilization. Dr. Berdan has appeared often on the History Channel and the Discovery Channel commenting on the indigenous Mexica, commonly known as the Aztecs. Dr. Berdan is one of a few scholars in the world versed in the Aztec language, Nahuatl. With several books and close to 100 publications to her credit. She is the author or co-author of 13 books, including the magisterial and prize-winning four volume Codex Mendoza. Compiled in Mexico City around 1541 under the supervision of Spanish clerics, the codex was intended to inform King Charles V about his newly conquered subjects. The manuscript contains pictorial accounts of Aztec emperors’ conquests and tribute paid by the conquered, as well as an ethnographic record of Aztec daily life from cradle to grave. This publication is an unsurpassed source of information about Aztec history, geography, economy, social and political organization, glyphic writing, costumes, textiles, military attire, and indigenous art styles. Dr. Berdan is currently working on four additional books about Aztec society.
KENNETH HIRTHPennsylvania State University
Dr. Hirth’s research focuses on the origin and development of ranked and state-level societies in the New World. He is especially interested in political economy and how forms of resource control lead to the development of structural inequalities within society. Topics of special interest include: exchange systems, craft production, settlement pattern studies, and preindustrial urbanism. Methodological interests include: lithic technology, ceramics, spatial analysis, and lithic use-wear. Dr. Hirth is one of just three internationally recognized experts on the archaeological site of Xochicalco, an epiclassic site in Mexico. The polity of Xochicalco reach its greatest splendor after the fall of Teotihuacan. It was a militaristic power in Central Mexico that preceded Tenochtitlan. Dr. Hirth has published: (1) Ancient Urbanism at Xochicalco. The Evolution and Organization of a Prehispanic Society (Vols. 1 and 2); (2) Archaeological Research at Xochicalco; and (3) The Xochicalco Mapping Project, Archaeological Research at Xochicalco.
ERIC TALADOIRE, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne
Fluent in multiple languages, Dr. Taladoire is considered a professor’s professor and a scholar among scholars. His interests in Mesoamerica are wide and include Mayan architecture and settlement patterns, but his forte is the Mesoamerican ballgame. He has written extensively on the subject. Additionally, the Université de Paris, Panthéon-Sorbonne is considered a major training ground for eminent Mexican archaeologists. Dr. Leonardo López Lujan was a student of Dr. Taladoire during his studies at Sorbonne. Among Dr. Taladoire’s publications and articles are The Political and Confluctual Aspects of the Ballgame in the Northern Chiapas Area; Les Terrains de Jeu de Balle (Mesoamerique et Sud-Ouest des Etats-Unis): Etudes Mesoamericaines, Serie II #4; The Maya (Spanish, French, and German Editions), la vie quotidienne des Mayas et des Aztéques; and Mesoamerique, and The Architectural Background of the Pre-Hispanic Ballgame, The Sport of Life and Death: The Mesoamerican Ballgame

ELOISE QUIÑONES-KEBER, City University New York, Professor of Pre-Columbian Art and Colonial Art of the Americas

Professor Eloise Quiñones-Keber’s research interests center primarily on Mesoamerican manuscripts, Aztec (Mexica) art before and after the Spanish conquest of Mexico, and issues surrounding the encounter between indigenous and European traditions in the Americas.   She is finishing a book on “reinventing Aztec art,” for which she was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1998-1999.  She received the 1996 Ralph Waldo Emerson Award in humanistic studies from the Phi Beta Kappa Society for Codex Telleriano Remensis and the 1996 Distinguished Scholarship Award from Baruch College, CUNY, where she also teaches.  Publications: Editor. Thematic Issue on 16th-Century Mexican Conventos (missions) for Colonial Latin American Review, in preparation, Editor. Representing Aztec Ritual. Boulder:University Press of Colorado, 2002, Editor. “Precious Greenstone, Precious Quetzal Feather / In Chalchihuitl” inQuetzalli:  Mesoamerican Essays in Honor of Doris Heyden. Lancaster, CA: Labyrinthos Press, 2000, Codex Telleriano Remensis:  Ritual, Divination, and History in a Pictorial Aztec Manuscript.  Austin:University of Texas Press, 1995, Editor.Chipping away on Earth: Studies in Prehispanic and Colonial Mexico.  Lancaster, CA:Labyrinthos Press, 1994, Co-editor. Mixteca Puebla:  Discoveries and Research in Mesoamerican Art and Archaeology.  Lancaster, CA:Labyrinthos Press, 1994, Co-editor. The Work of Bernardino de Sahagún: Pioneer Ethnographer of Sixteenth-Century Aztec Mexico.  Austin: University of Texas Press, 1988, Co-author.  Art of Aztec Mexico: Treasures of Tenochtitlan.  Exh. Cat. Washington, D.C.:  The National Gallery of Art, 1983.

KEVIN TERRACIANO, University of California, Los Angeles
Kevin Terraciano is Professor of History, chair of the Latin American Studies Graduate Program, and interim director of the Latin American Institute. He specializes in Colonial Latin American history, especially Mexico and the indigenous cultures and languages of central and southern Mexico. Kevin Terraciano is also the current President of the American Society of Ethnohistory. Terraciano collaborated with Professors Lisa Sousa (Occidental College) and Matthew Restall (Penn State University) on a volume of edited, translated, and analyzed native-language texts from Colonial Mexico and Guatemala, titled Mesoamerican Voices: Native-Language Writings from Colonial Mexico, Oaxaca, Yucatan, and Guatemala (Cambridge University Press, 2005). Terraciano is also an expert in the Nahua language, the indigenous language of Central Mexico.
DAVÍD CARRASCOHarvard University
Dr. Davíd Carrasco is the Neil L. Rudenstine Professor of the Study of Latin America, with a joint appointment with the Department of Anthropology in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences.  He is a Mexican American historian of religions with a particular interest in religious dimensions in human experience, Mesoamerican cities as symbols, immigration, and the Mexican-American borderlands. Working with Mexican archaeologists, he has carried out 20 years of research in the excavations and archives associated with the sites of Teotihuacan and Mexico-Tenochtitlan. He has participated in spirited debates at Harvard with Cornel West and Samuel Huntington on the topics of race, culture, and religion in the Americas. This has resulted in publications on ritual violence and sacred cities; religion and transculturation; the Great Aztec Temple; and the history of religions in Mesoamerica and Latino/a religions. Recent collaborative publications includeBreaking Through Mexico’s Past: Digging the Aztecs With Eduardo Matos Moctezuma (2007) and Cave, City, and Eagle’s Nest: An Interpretive Journey Through the Mapa de Cuauhtinchan No. 2 (2007; gold winner of the 2008 PubWest Book Design Award in the academic book/nontrade category) recently featured in the The New York Review of Books. His work has included a special emphasis on the religious dimensions of Latino experience: mestizaje, the myth of Aztlan, transculturation, and La Virgen de Guadalupe. He is co-producer of the film Alambrista: The Director’s Cut, which puts a human face on the life and struggles of undocumented Mexican farm workers in the United States, and he edited Alambrista and the U.S.-Mexico Border: Film, Music, and Stories of Undocumented Immigrants (University of New Mexico Press). He is editor-in-chief of the award-winning three-volume Oxford Encyclopedia of Mesoamerican Cultures. His most recent publication is a new abridgement of Bernal Díaz del Castillo’s memoir of the conquest of Mexico, History of the Conquest of New Spain (University of New Mexico Press). Carrasco has received the Mexican Order of the Aztec Eagle, the highest honor the Mexican government gives to a foreign national.
Manuel Aguilar-Moreno was born in Guadalajara, México. He received his B.S in Electronic Engineering and then a certification in Education at the ITESO University. Following this, Dr. Aguilar-Moreno received an additional degree in Mexican History with special emphasis on the state of Jalisco, from “El Colegio de Jalisco”. In 1997 he completed his studies for a Master’s degree in Latin American Studies at the University of Texas At Austin, and then in 1999, received an Interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Art History and Anthropology, also from the University of Texas at Austin where he studied with the late Dr. Linda Schele and Dr. Karl Butzer.
Dr. Aguilar-Moreno has made numerous intensive cultural and investigative research trips within his native Mexico as well as to diverse countries of America, Europe, Asia and Africa. He has been a professor of Art History, World History, History of México and Biblical Literature at such institutions as the Jesuit University and the Instituto de Ciencias, in Guadalajara, Mexico; the University of San Diego, California; the University of Texas at Austin; and Saint Peter’s Prep School in New Jersey. Dr. Aguilar-Moreno was also the Principal of Instituto de Ciencias, the Jesuit High School in Guadalajara.He is author of numerous books, among them: The Belen Cemetery: an architectural and historical study (1992), The Meaning of the Bible (1994), Quest for the Atlquiahuitl: Cajititlan (1995), El Panteón de Belén y El Culto a los Muertos en México: Una búsqueda de lo sobrenatural (1997), The Cult of the Dead in México: Continuity of a Millennial Tradition (1998), The Perfection of Silence: The Cult of Death in Mexico and the Cemetery of Belén (2003), Ulama (2004), Utopia de Piedra: El Arte Tequitqui de Mexico (2005), and Handbook of Life in the Ancient Aztec World (2006). He also has written countless articles in edited books, journals, magazines and newspapers.Dr. Aguilar-Moreno is frequently asked to present on the History of Mexican Art as well as World Art in the United States, Mexico and Europe. Currently, Dr. Aguilar-Moreno is a professor of World and Latin American Art History at California State University Los Angeles. He is also professor of Mexican Art History for summer courses at the University of San Diego. In 2009, Dr. Aguilar was honored at Cal State L.A. with an Outstanding Professor Award for 2008-2009.
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Alfredo Lopez Austin Will be in LA in 2012!

Alfredo Lopez Austin Will be in LA in 2012!.

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AHS Mesoamerican Conference February 10 & 11, 2012

The Art History Society is proud to serve as the host site for an International Two-Day Mesoamerican Conference in Homage to Alfredo Lopez Austin on February 10-11, 2012 at CSULA. Not only will Alfredo Lopez Austin be present but also the top archaeologists and art historians from Mexico, Europe and the United States. This will be the largest academic event of its nature in CSULA history. Shortly we will be announcing the complete list of speakers and program. The theme is Teotihuacan to Tenochtitlan: Cultural Continuity in Central Mexico. Please reserve these dates and be ready to attend this major event

AHSMeso2012@gmail.com

http://csulaahsmesoamericanconference2012.wordpress.com/

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